Flesch (surname)

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"Subject: French "Le Fleche" to German "Flesch" - Trier Lorraine, Germany Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 17:31:02 GMT

Greetings, I am looking for information about the Le Fleche family changing its name to Flesch. I have some brief information on it:

"Bernard La Fleche, born in Treue, Lorraine in 1783 fought in Napolean's army. After Napolean's defeat in 1815, the usual settlements were made, Treue, Lorraine, France became Trier Lorraine, Germany. All French names were changed. Thereafter the name "La Fleche" was changed to "Flesch." If anyone has more infomation, or can direct me to some helpful book on this, I would greatly appreciate it."


--- Flesch is the old occupational title => from Fleschner --- Meanings of names (compiled from the correspondence between Matthias Flesch (genealogical researcher) and Prof. Dr. Horst Naumann from the German Language Society GfdS). According to the "Deutsches Namenslexikon" (German Dictionary of Names) by Hans Bahlow the name Flesch, Flesche, Fleschner from Flaschner = plumber or more precisely someone who produced tin bottles. In Eisenschmitt, in the commune of Manderscheid, the Flesch family can be traced back to the 16th century. In Eisenschmitt, and only there, there were and are numerous descendants of the Fleschs. And just as the Saarland, this area was a significant location of iron industry and therefore it does not seem to be unusual for the name Flesch to be rather frequent there. Outside of Eisenschmitt, in the surrounding villages and towns that is, the name Flesch increases only around 1800, which is after the comedown of the Eisenschmitt ironworks. This gives us reason to believe, that the Fleschs may not, after all, come from the Eifel area, but that there was a purposeful migration towards Eisenschmitt, the area of iron industry, that is. It was only after its decline that they moved to the new industrial centres in the Ruhrgebiet and the surrounding areas of Eisenschmitt. From hearsay it seems, that the name of Flesch is also known in Louxemburg. Hans Bahlow alludes to a Joh. Flesche (1389) in the Elsaß region. Brechenmacher, just as Bahlow, mentions a knight‘s servant from Rappoltsweiler (1389) by the name of Joh. Flesche. He also notes a place name (field name) near Mainz, where an acre iuxta dictum Flesche at about 1300 is attested. A migration of the Fleschs from the Elsaß/Luxemburg region via Trier to the Hunsrück, to the Saarland, to the Eifel and finally to the Ruhrgebiet region seems possible. Most of today’s forms and articulations of our family names stabilised itself within the 15th /16th century. The family name Flesch may thus be either a place name or a generic name. In the Alemannic, the Rhenish and the Lower Rhenish dialects Flesch is attested as meaning Flasche (bottle). In older forms of German the Early Modern German forms flesch and flesche and the Middle High German and Middle Low German vlasche and vlesche exist side by side. This means that one of the first name bearers was either called after his place of residence at a bottle shaped land parcel, or it was through the production of bottles (from tin, glass, wood or leather) that he received the generic name as in cases like Beil, Becher, Krug, Korb etc.. The latter option comes closest to the above mentioned speculations. The geographic point of origin is then most likely to be found in the midwestern part of Germany. You will also find Flesch – apart from Fleschen and Fles – as a family name with the same meaning and usage in the Flemish parts of Belgium. Here, however, the older evidences all refer to Flasche(n). A relation to the French fleche = arrow or point is rather unlikely, because in this case an east-middle German sound shift from -ch to -sch would have to be assumed. Hypothetically, relations to the Alemannic Flosch (older vlosch) = sump, pond or the Alemannic flösch = spongy, feeblish etc. would then have to be considered as well. This does not seem likely, however, as there are no clues for this theory to be supported or corroborated.


--- Flesch as a name modification of the name of the house "Haus Flasche" in Frankfurt --- The Jewish population was forced to live for over 400 years in Frankfurt' s Judengasse. It was located outside the city walls in the East End of the city of Frankfurt and ran in a slight curve from today's Konstablerwache almost as far as the Main river. It was about 330 m long, 3-4 meters wide, and had three town gates. These were locked at night and on Sundays and (Christian) holidays; when they were closed, the Jewish population was essentially locked in. In the beginning probably 15 families lived in the ghetto; in the 16th century the number of inhabitants of the Jews' Lane had risen to some 3,000. At the end of the 19th century, the Judengasse was torn down. The work took place in two phases. Most of the inhabitants moved to the East End. At the southern end of the former Judengasse, which was renamed Börneplatz in 1885, a new synagogue was opened in 1882. The area was left derelict after 1945. It was used first as a car park, then as a petrol station and finally as the wholesale flower market - until the Municipal Utilities decided to build its administrative center there. A fierce debate ensued nationwide as to what should be done with the archaeological remains uncovered during the construction work. Of the original 195 houses, 19 foundations were found - today five of them can be seen at "Museum Judengasse" and are used to present everyday life, living conditions and the religious customs of the Jewish inhabitants.

House Flasche The Flasche was built around 1530 for the schoolteachrer Jakob from Prague. It was part of a row of buildings erected in what had previously been an undeveloped gap in the Judengasse. This row also included the neighbouring house of the gravedigger Krug, later known as the Goldener Strauß, the Spiegel and the Korb on the opposite (west) side of the street. In 1583 the Flasche was subdivided to create the neighbouring Mohr. Akiwa Frankfurter, the son of the teacher Jakob, lived first in the Flasche and was a famous scholar. From the Flasche he moved to the Traube and then to the Heppe. Records show the occupants of the Flasche continued to be community servants for a long time. The family name Flesch derives from this house, which was also occupied by members of the Hatten, Goldschmidt and Hirsch families. The house was destroyed in the fire of 1711 but soon rebuilt. In 1865 the city took it over for demolition.

Family Flesch The Flesch family migrated from Prague in 1530 and settled at first in the Flasche, from which they derived their family name. Initially the Flesches worked as schoolteachers, and the famous teacher Akiwa of Frankfurt was probably a member of their family. Up till the 17th century the family was of modest means, but a variety of businesses brought them wealth during the 18th century.


--- Flesch as a name modification of Filicicchia to Flesch --- In order to simplify the pronunciation many emigrates decided to alter their names. In the USA a change thus lead from Filicicchia to Flesch. See also: http://www.genealogy.com/users/f/l/e/Charles-A-Flesch-jr/ftitree.html


--- Flesch as a name modification of La Fleche (France) to Flesch (D) ---

In order to simplify the pronunciation many emigrates decided to alter their names. In Germany a change thus lead from the name of town "La Fleche" (France) to Flesch (D).

See also the original quotation:

"Subject: French "Le Fleche" to German "Flesch" - Trier Lorraine, Germany Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 17:31:02 GMT

Greetings, I am looking for information about the Le Fleche family changing its name to Flesch. I have some brief information on it:

"Bernard La Fleche, born in Treue, Lorraine in 1783 fought in Napolean's army. After Napolean's defeat in 1815, the usual settlements were made, Treue, Lorraine, France became Trier Lorraine, Germany. All French names were changed. Thereafter the name "La Fleche" was changed to "Flesch." If anyone has more infomation, or can direct me to some helpful book on this, I would greatly appreciate it." see also: http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/GEN-DE/1998-01/0884194262

--- Flesch ist die alte Berufsbezeichnung => von Fleschner --- Namensbedeutungen (zusammengetragen aus einer Korrespondenz zwischen Matthias Flesch, Ahnenforscher und Prof. Dr. Horst Naumann, Gesellschaft für deutsche Sprache e.V.) Laut "Deutsches Namenslexikon" von Hans Bahlow kommt der Name Flesch, Flesche, Fleschner von Flaschner = Klempner (der Blechflaschen herstellte). Die Familie Flesch lässt sich in Eisenschmitt in der Verbandsgemeinde Manderscheid bis in das 16. Jahrhundert zurückverfolgen. In Eisenschmitt und zwar ausschließlich nur dort gab und gibt es zahlreiche Nachkommen der Flesch's. Es gab dort ebenso wie im Saarland eine bedeutende Eisenindustrie, scheinbar ist daher der Name "dort" nichts ungewöhnliches. Außerhalb von Eisenschmitt, d.h. in den umliegenden Dörfern und Städten erscheint Flesch vermehrt erst gegen 1800, also nach dem Niedergang der Eisenschmitter Eisenhütten. Dies könnte bedeuten das die Flesch nicht aus der Eifel stammen, sie sind gezielt nach Eisenschmitt - zur Eisenindustrie - gewandert. Erst nach dessen Niedergang sind sie in die neuen Industriezentren im Ruhrgebiet und in die Umgebung von Eisenschmitt hin abgewandert. Vom Hörensagen ist der Name Flesch auch in Luxemburg bekannt. Hans Bahlow erwähnt einen Joh. Flesche 1389 im Elsaß. Brechenmacher nennt - wie Bahlow - für 1389 einen Joh. Flesche als Edelknecht aus Rappoltsweiler; er nennt außerdem einen Örtlichkeitsnamen (Flurnamen) bei Mainz, wo ein Acker iuxta dictum Flesche um 1300 bezeugt ist. Eine Wanderbewegung der Flesch's aus Ri. Elsaß/Luxemburg über Trier zum Hunsrück, zum Saarland und zur Eifel, bis hin ins Ruhrgebiet scheint möglich. Die heutigen Lautungen unserer Familiennamen haben sich meist im 15./16. Jahrhundert stabilisiert. Beim Familiennamen Flesch kann es sich also sowohl um einen Örtlichkeitsnamen als auch um einen Übernamen handeln. Flesch ist im Alemannischen, im Rheinischen und im Niederrheinischen mit der Bedeutung Flasche bezeugt. Im älteren Deutsch stehen flesch und flesche (im Frühneuhochdeutschen) und vlasche/vlesche (im Mittelhochdeutschen und Mittelniederdeutschen) nebeneinander. Entweder wurde durch den Örtlichkeitsnamen ein erster Namensträger nach seinem Wohnort an einem flaschenähnlich geformten Flurstück benannt, oder durch den Übernamen erhielt ein erster Namensträger nach der Herstellung von Flaschen (aus Zinn, Glas, Holz, Leder) analog zu Familiennamen wie Beil, Becher, Krug, Korb seinen Namen. Die zuletzt genannt Erklärungsmöglichkeit kommt den obigen Vermutungen am nächsten. Der räumliche Ausgangspunkt wäre dann im Westmitteldeutschen zu suchen. Flesch gibt es - neben Fleschen und Fles - als Familienname in der gleichen Bedeutung und Verwendung auch im flämischen Teil Belgiens. Aber dort lauten die älteren Belege durchweg Flasche(n). Ein Zusammenhang mit französisch fleche = Pfeil, Spitze; Langbaum dürfte kaum anzunehmen sein, denn dann müsste von einem ostmitteldeutschen Wandel -ch zu -sch ausgegangen werden. Hypothetisch kämen dann außerdem Beziehungen zu alemannisch Flosch (älter vlosch) = Sickergrube, Teich oder alemannisch flösch = schwammig, schwächlich usw. usf. in Betracht. Aber dafür gibt es keinerlei Anhaltspunkte.


--- Flesch aus einer Namensabwandlung des Hausnamens "Haus Flasche" in Frankfurt --- In der Frankfurter Judengasse, dem Ghetto, musste die jüdische Bevölkerung über 400 Jahre wohnen. Die Gasse lag außerhalb der Stadtmauer im Osten der Stadt Frankfurt und verlief in einem leichten Bogen von der heutigen Konstablerwache fast bis zum Main hin. Sie war ca. 330 m lang, drei bis vier Meter breit, hatte drei Stadttore, die nachts sowie an Sonn- und (christlichen) Feiertagen geschlossen waren; die jüdische Bevölkerung war zu diesen Zeiten eingesperrt. Zu Beginn waren es wohl 15 Familien, die in der Gasse lebten, im 16. Jahrhundert stieg die Zahl der Einwohner in der Judengasse auf ungefähr 3.000 Menschen an. Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts wurde die Judengasse in zwei Phasen abgerissen und der Großteil der Bevölkerung zog in die nahegelegenen Häuser im Ostend um. Am südlichen Ende der ehemaligen Judengasse, die 1885 den Namen Börneplatz erhielt, wurde 1882 eine neue Synagoge eingeweiht. Nach 1945 blieb das Areal unbeachtet. Es wurde als Parkplatz, als Tankstelle und Blumengroßmarkt genutzt, bis die Stadtwerke ihr neues Verwaltungszentrum dort errichten wollten. Ein bundesweiter Streit begann, was mit den dort freigelegten archäologischen Zeugnissen geschehen solle. Von den ursprünglichen 195 Häusern blieben fünf Fundamente erhalten, an denen man heute im Museum Judengasse den Alltag, die Wohnsituation und die religiösen Gebräuche der jüdischen Bevölkerung nachvollziehen kann.

Haus Flasche Das Haus Flasche wurde um 1530 für den Schullehrer Jakob aus Prag erbaut. Es war Teil einer Reihe von Gebäuden, die in einer bis dahin in der Judengasse verbliebenen Baulücke errichtet wurden. Zu diesen Gebäuden gehörte auch das danebenliegende Haus des Totengräbers Krug, später Goldener Strauß genannt, sowie das Haus Spiegel und das auf der Westseite gegenübergelegene Haus Korb. Im Jahre 1583 wurde von dem Haus Flasche das Nachbarhaus Mohr abgeteilt. Der Sohn des Lehrers Jakob, Akiwa Frankfurter, der zunächst in der Flasche wohnte, war ein berühmter Gelehrter. Er zog von dieser Wohnung in das Haus Traube und dann in das Haus Heppe. Die Bewohner des Hauses Flasche waren noch lange Zeit nachweisbar Gemeindebeamte. Der Familienname Flesch leitet sich von diesem Haus ab. Ebenso wohnten hier Mitglieder der Familien Hatten, Goldschmidt und Hirsch. Bei dem großen Brand von 1711 wurde das Haus zerstört und später wiederaufgebaut. Im Jahre 1865 erwarb es die Stadt zum baldigen Abbruch.

Die Familie Flesch Die Familie Flesch war 1530 aus Prag eingewandert und ließ sich zunächst im Haus zur Flasche nieder, von dem sie ihren Familiennamen erhielt. Zunächst haben sich die Fleschs als Schulmeister betätigt, unter ihnen war wahrscheinlich der bekannte Lehrmeister Akiwa Frankfurter. Bis ins 17. Jahrhundert hinein war die Familie minderbemittelt. Im 18. Jahrhundert kamen sie durch verschiedene Handelsgeschäfte zu Wohlstand.


--- Flesch aus einer Namensabwandlung von Filicicchia zu Flesch --- Bei vielen Auswanderen wurden zur Vereinfachung der Aussprache Namen umgewandelt. So führte eine Änderung in den USA von Filicicchia zu Flesch. Siehe hierzu auch.


--- Flesch aus einer Namensabwandlung von La Fleche (F) zu Flesch (D) --- Bei vielen Auswanderen wurden zur Vereinfachung der Aussprache Namen umgewandelt. So führte eine Änderung in den Deutschland von La Fleche (F) zu Flesch (D). Möglicherweise handelt es sich aber auch hier nur um einen schon vorher aus der Eifel bzw. dem Saarland ausgewanderten deutschen Flesch.

Siehe hierzu auch das Originalzitat:

"Subject: French "Le Fleche" to German "Flesch" - Trier Lorraine, Germany Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 17:31:02 GMT

Greetings, I am looking for information about the Le Fleche family changing its name to Flesch. I have some brief information on it:

"Bernard La Fleche, born in Treue, Lorraine in 1783 fought in Napolean's army. After Napolean's defeat in 1815, the usual settlements were made, Treue, Lorraine, France became Trier Lorraine, Germany. All French names were changed. Thereafter the name "La Fleche" was changed to "Flesch." If anyone has more infomation, or can direct me to some helpful book on this, I would greatly appreciate it."


--- Flesch is the old occupational title => from Fleschner --- Meanings of names (compiled from the correspondence between Matthias Flesch (genealogical researcher) and Prof. Dr. Horst Naumann from the German Language Society GfdS). According to the "Deutsches Namenslexikon" (German Dictionary of Names) by Hans Bahlow the name Flesch, Flesche, Fleschner from Flaschner = plumber or more precisely someone who produced tin bottles. In Eisenschmitt, in the commune of Manderscheid, the Flesch family can be traced back to the 16th century. In Eisenschmitt, and only there, there were and are numerous descendants of the Fleschs. And just as the Saarland, this area was a significant location of iron industry and therefore it does not seem to be unusual for the name Flesch to be rather frequent there. Outside of Eisenschmitt, in the surrounding villages and towns that is, the name Flesch increases only around 1800, which is after the comedown of the Eisenschmitt ironworks. This gives us reason to believe, that the Fleschs may not, after all, come from the Eifel area, but that there was a purposeful migration towards Eisenschmitt, the area of iron industry, that is. It was only after its decline that they moved to the new industrial centres in the Ruhrgebiet and the surrounding areas of Eisenschmitt. From hearsay it seems, that the name of Flesch is also known in Louxemburg. Hans Bahlow alludes to a Joh. Flesche (1389) in the Elsaß region. Brechenmacher, just as Bahlow, mentions a knight‘s servant from Rappoltsweiler (1389) by the name of Joh. Flesche. He also notes a place name (field name) near Mainz, where an acre iuxta dictum Flesche at about 1300 is attested. A migration of the Fleschs from the Elsaß/Luxemburg region via Trier to the Hunsrück, to the Saarland, to the Eifel and finally to the Ruhrgebiet region seems possible. Most of today’s forms and articulations of our family names stabilised itself within the 15th /16th century. The family name Flesch may thus be either a place name or a generic name. In the Alemannic, the Rhenish and the Lower Rhenish dialects Flesch is attested as meaning Flasche (bottle). In older forms of German the Early Modern German forms flesch and flesche and the Middle High German and Middle Low German vlasche and vlesche exist side by side. This means that one of the first name bearers was either called after his place of residence at a bottle shaped land parcel, or it was through the production of bottles (from tin, glass, wood or leather) that he received the generic name as in cases like Beil, Becher, Krug, Korb etc.. The latter option comes closest to the above mentioned speculations. The geographic point of origin is then most likely to be found in the midwestern part of Germany. You will also find Flesch – apart from Fleschen and Fles – as a family name with the same meaning and usage in the Flemish parts of Belgium. Here, however, the older evidences all refer to Flasche(n). A relation to the French fleche = arrow or point is rather unlikely, because in this case an east-middle German sound shift from -ch to -sch would have to be assumed. Hypothetically, relations to the Alemannic Flosch (older vlosch) = sump, pond or the Alemannic flösch = spongy, feeblish etc. would then have to be considered as well. This does not seem likely, however, as there are no clues for this theory to be supported or corroborated.


--- Flesch as a name modification of the name of the house "Haus Flasche" in Frankfurt --- The Jewish population was forced to live for over 400 years in Frankfurt' s Judengasse. It was located outside the city walls in the East End of the city of Frankfurt and ran in a slight curve from today's Konstablerwache almost as far as the Main river. It was about 330 m long, 3-4 meters wide, and had three town gates. These were locked at night and on Sundays and (Christian) holidays; when they were closed, the Jewish population was essentially locked in. In the beginning probably 15 families lived in the ghetto; in the 16th century the number of inhabitants of the Jews' Lane had risen to some 3,000. At the end of the 19th century, the Judengasse was torn down. The work took place in two phases. Most of the inhabitants moved to the East End. At the southern end of the former Judengasse, which was renamed Börneplatz in 1885, a new synagogue was opened in 1882. The area was left derelict after 1945. It was used first as a car park, then as a petrol station and finally as the wholesale flower market - until the Municipal Utilities decided to build its administrative center there. A fierce debate ensued nationwide as to what should be done with the archaeological remains uncovered during the construction work. Of the original 195 houses, 19 foundations were found - today five of them can be seen at "Museum Judengasse" and are used to present everyday life, living conditions and the religious customs of the Jewish inhabitants.

House Flasche The Flasche was built around 1530 for the schoolteachrer Jakob from Prague. It was part of a row of buildings erected in what had previously been an undeveloped gap in the Judengasse. This row also included the neighbouring house of the gravedigger Krug, later known as the Goldener Strauß, the Spiegel and the Korb on the opposite (west) side of the street. In 1583 the Flasche was subdivided to create the neighbouring Mohr. Akiwa Frankfurter, the son of the teacher Jakob, lived first in the Flasche and was a famous scholar. From the Flasche he moved to the Traube and then to the Heppe. Records show the occupants of the Flasche continued to be community servants for a long time. The family name Flesch derives from this house, which was also occupied by members of the Hatten, Goldschmidt and Hirsch families. The house was destroyed in the fire of 1711 but soon rebuilt. In 1865 the city took it over for demolition.

Family Flesch The Flesch family migrated from Prague in 1530 and settled at first in the Flasche, from which they derived their family name. Initially the Flesches worked as schoolteachers, and the famous teacher Akiwa of Frankfurt was probably a member of their family. Up till the 17th century the family was of modest means, but a variety of businesses brought them wealth during the 18th century.


--- Flesch as a name modification of Filicicchia to Flesch --- In order to simplify the pronunciation many emigrates decided to alter their names. In the USA a change thus lead from Filicicchia to Flesch. See also: http://www.genealogy.com/users/f/l/e/Charles-A-Flesch-jr/ftitree.html


--- Flesch as a name modification of La Fleche (France) to Flesch (D) ---

In order to simplify the pronunciation many emigrates decided to alter their names. In Germany a change thus lead from the name of town "La Fleche" (France) to Flesch (D).

See also the original quotation:

"Subject: French "Le Fleche" to German "Flesch" - Trier Lorraine, Germany Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 17:31:02 GMT

Greetings, I am looking for information about the Le Fleche family changing its name to Flesch. I have some brief information on it:

"Bernard La Fleche, born in Treue, Lorraine in 1783 fought in Napolean's army. After Napolean's defeat in 1815, the usual settlements were made, Treue, Lorraine, France became Trier Lorraine, Germany. All French names were changed. Thereafter the name "La Fleche" was changed to "Flesch." If anyone has more infomation, or can direct me to some helpful book on this, I would greatly appreciate it." see also: http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/GEN-DE/1998-01/0884194262

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